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Thinking Through Making: Weaving Workshop

 

Thinking Through Making: Weaving Workshop

Wednesday, June 23, 2021 13.00 – 15.00 (GMT+3)

Live video conference event

The event is free of charge and held in Turkish.

Simultaneous translation is provided.

Attendance is limited to 10 participants.

For info and reservations: studyo@istanbulmodern.org

 

“Crafting Technology for Textiles”- a collaborative project between Istanbul Modern and the Royal College of Art (RCA), London

During the two-hour workshop run by Begüm Cânâ Özgür, the participants will learn about and apply basic weaving techniques by working on simple looms to research how the cultural tradition of weaving can find its place in contemporary life today. In the workshop, left alone with their minds, participants will experience the meditative effect of thinking with their hands.


 

Begüm Cânâ Özgür, Designer, Studio Begüm Cânâ Özgür

Studio Begüm Cânâ Özgür is a product and textile oriented design studio based in Istanbul and in New York.

With a background in Interior Architecture, Begüm Cânâ Özgür received her master’s degree from Cranbrook Academy of Art, 3D Design department.  In 2014, she started her studio based in Istanbul where the cultural richness of the land has been the major motive in her work, developing an interest in ancient craft practices. Her recent work focuses on textiles and concepts formed around textiles. More...

Cânâ’s work integrates design, art and crafts. Starting from the initial ideation, her design process is carried out hands on. She plays with common materials and existing techniques to fully understand their potential to develop a new contemporary expression. The experimental process results in the development and adaptation of skills, suggesting new ways of doing. Which enables design ideas finding a truly authentic form of body in her work.

A collaborative project between Istanbul Modern and the Royal College of Art (RCA), London, “Crafting Technology for Textiles” has been funded by Arts and Humanities Research Council and Newton Fund.